Osteoporosis

Our bones are living tissue that give our body structure, allow us to move and protect our organs. Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become thin and  lose their strength. This can lead to fractures, which cause pain and make everyday activities extremely difficult. After a hip fracture, about one-quarter of people die or never walk again. 

It’s estimated over 200 million women have osteoporosis. That’s more than the combined populations of the Germany, the United Kingdom and France.

Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men over the age of fifty will experience an osteoporotic fracture.

In fact, every three seconds a bone will break, somewhere in the world, because of this disease.

Many people won’t know they have osteoporosis until their first fracture, which is why it’s called the ‘silent disease’. Even after a break, it often goes untreated.

The good news is osteoporosis can be diagnosed and treated and fractures often prevented through healthy lifestyle choices and appropriate medication for those in need.
 

Our Bone Health Advocates

Magida El Roumi, celebrated Lebanese singer

‘While pursuing our dreams and hopes,
we tend to forget the importance of our bones, and we end up wearing them out - we realize only when it is too late that we didn’t take care of them. This is why I am participating in this campaign, to shed light on this truth, because if we are aware we can avoid this terrible disease and thereby avoid misery, sadness and a poor quality of life.’

Olivieri Toscani, Italian photographer, speaking about his photographic exhibition "Osteoporosis: A Photographic Vision"

By photographing people in black and white, without the camouflage of clothing or props, viewers can better understand the true nature of osteoporosis. I believe knowledge is the basis of osteoporosis education. The people in this exhibition have shown a large amount of generosity by revealing their physical situation in this way. Through the visual effect of the exhibition they will help other people to find out if they are also exposed to the risk.

Maureen McTeer, medical law specialist, human rights advocate, author, patron of Osteoporosis Canada. Message on the occasion of the 2nd IOF Women Leaders Roundtable, 2006

As patron of Osteoporosis Canada for many years, I am pleased that we have successfully changed the image of osteoporosis as a disease of elderly women, a group who historically have had neither economic nor political clout –to a disease that can strike us all whether we are men or women, young or old.